Speech of H.E. President Anwar El-Sadat on the Occasion of the Reopening of the Suez Canal

1975

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In the name of God, 

History has recorded that the Suez Canal was closed down to navigation more than once. The last time was on June 5th 1967 as a result of Israelís aggression on Egypt. But, with Godís will and in front of the whole world, I declare that the Suez Canal was fully purged of Israeli aggression following the glorious crossing of the canal on October 6th 1973 and the battles of dignity and liberation that followed. It became natural that this vital waterway should resume its flow for the welfare of the community of mankind and continue its international vocation in connecting the people in the four corners of the world and enhancing exchange and interaction among its peoples and nations.

It was the people of this land who dug the canal with their sweat and tears to serve as a link among the various continents and civilizations. Many martyrs fell when they crossed that canal to spread peace and security on its banks. It is them who reopen it for navigation, just like they dug it in the first place, to be a tributary for peace and a thoroughfare for prosperity and cooperation among mankind.

While the Arab people of Egypt present this initiative in the context of their contribution to the world civilization and their international message, they remind friendly nations that a dear part of its soil is still under foreign occupation, and that an entire people still suffer forced exile and hideous oppression.

To all forces fighting for international welfare, peace and human advancement, Egypt presents this step on its part in loyalty and to facilitate matters for all friendly and peace loving peoples.

Egypt, as it continues to contribute to human advancement, reiterates its absolute determination to undertake all its sacred duty towards [the liberation of] its land and the Arab land still occupied by the enemy in the Golan, Sinai and Palestine as well as work for [regaining] the usurped Arab rights.